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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
care reduction. no, no wants to do that. and no one wants to eat our seed corn. investment in education, investment in infrastructure, investment in sign b scientific research in order to keep narrow loopholes open, reductions if you move the business overseas. no, they don't want to debate that. but now we have a budget. because of the leadership of the chair of the budget committee and the members of her committee -- and, by the way, this is no -- this is not a small group of democrats. it runs from our most liberal members to our most conservative members, all united around the budget that is fiscally responsible. it meets the gramm-rudman -- i mean, i'm on old guy -- the simpson-bowles constraints, budget target. it invests in jobs in the economy, and closes loopholes and preserves the middle class' ability to grow and proceed. so, we now are, you know, in this 30-hour thing. we could actually be debating the budget while those 30 hours tick. we don't have to be sitting here doing nothing. and one of our colleagues said, he'd like to debate the budget two weeks from now. why is he p
so frequently face discrimination in everyday life. in all aspects of their life. from education, employment and health care, to all of their social relationships. as a result it's harder for them to stay healthy, to get health care insurance coverage, and to get the health care they need. here at cap we are leveraging implementation of the affordable care act help eliminate barriers that keep the and transgender people in the with hiv from achieving the highest animal health care needs, health care that they need. in particular, our lgbt stated change project is working in states across the country to support better data collection, better consumer protection, comprehensive and reliable insurance benefits, and a successful implementation of the medicaid expansion. when you look at the affordable care act, you know, those on the right complained that it is a bit of social engineering. and what it really is is trying to ensure that we cover all americans and provide them with good coverage. we should also look at the aca as an opportunity to expand basic rights for the lesbian, ga
-- lgbt community. the benefits and what is in play. outreach education and enrollment. you have to inform them of their choices and provide ways to help enroll new coverage where it is available. scaling of the workforce is how we can help with this. how will the care be monitored, and medicaid expansion decisions, health insurance exchanges and ultimately the future of ryan white. i will wrap up now and review of some of these thoughts with what the panel has to say. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, for that thoughtful overview. we are going to move now to our panel discussion. our moderator this morning is the advisor for lgbt policy and racial justice and director of the fire initiative that explores the impact of public policy on gay and transgender people of color. >> good morning, everyone. thank you for providing a great overview for us on how this benefits lgbt people and people living with hiv. includes the principles of universal design. some are marginalized among us and we are helping to work to get a system that works for everyone. we are we're going to talk about what we
. sons,cided that her four and the youngest, would be better served by a per educational methods than by various public schools -- would be better served by her educational methods. i think she was right. she was remarkably gifted in rk.viding that sparked -- spa i learned to love learning because of the way she introduced me to topics. it was very chaotic, i must say. >> what was the day like? >> there was no lesson plan or curriculum standards. my mother would say, ok, what is interesting today, and some days, it would be mathematics, and we might do only mathematics for three days in a row because it was interesting, and then it would get tiresome, and she would say, let's talk about history and talk about what the significance of that event was, and she was a playwright and very interested in languages. we did a lot of study of languages, and she would say, "ok, here is a word. do you think that is derived from greek or old french or latin?" and i got pretty good at bats, and we would go to the dictionary and looking it up -- and i got pretty good at that. and we would go to the d
grandson, henry adams, remembered louisa catherine fondly. in his works, the education of the adams, he described louisa catherine and her role in this house and relationship with the family. he felt that she was the odd man out, because she was born in england and educated in france. she remained a foreign personality to many of the adams's. he recollects her sitting in her paneled room, using her silver tea pot that that she brought with her from her home in england to the old house. she would entertain both herself and many guest in this room. john quincy adams and louisa would inherit this home from john adams. i thought about selling it, but then decided that it was important to the family story to hold onto the house for future generations. >> you can visit there today. >> yes. >> wonderful. where the papers? >> they are at the massachusetts historical society in boston. they used to be at the old house would distill my very, but they were transferred to the historical society for safekeeping. >> a question on facebook from genie webber. i have read excerpts from her autobiography
? we've solved a problem in our society, how to educate the next generation. and let me tell you, this is an important matter. we economists believe that the single most important factor shaping the future of any economy in the world including the united states is the quality and the quantity of the educated trained labor force it produces. college and universities are where we do that. if we're crippling an entire generation with debts they cannot support and jobs that will not encourage them to continue in their studies we are as a nation shooting ourselves in the foot going forward. it's a demonstration of the dysfunctionality of our system. and then the question comes could we forgive the students' debts? well, it's an interesting idea. but how then do you go to the people who can't afford their credit card debts or their home debts or their mortgage debts -- they're all hurting. and the students have a special claim, i give them that. and we need those students, i understand it. but we have to go at the root of a society which allows unspeakable wealth to accumulate in the h
, but john did. >> she was born in england and educated in france and she remained a phone personality to many of the adams, but not to henry as a world traveler herself. she was very well educated, very sophisticated socially i would say. she sort of entertained john quincy's road to the white house. >> she was not happy about returning to washington as the wife of a congressman. >> louisa catherine adams essentially became the campaign manager for her husband, john quincy adams' run for the presidency in 1824 by dominating the capital city's social circuit. following a contested election, the adams' four years in the white house were a turbulent period in american politics and washington society. we'll look at louisa adams' relationship with her husband john quincy adams and john and abigail on the road to 1600 pennsylvania avenue. good evening and welcome to our continuing series on first ladies influence and image in partnership with the white house historical association. the next installment is on louisa catherine adams, the wife of john quincy adams. we have two guests at the ta
find something pretty big in the department of education. we'll tell what you is up there. >>> a manhunt is underway after a prison director is gunned down in cold blood in his own home. ♪ [ slap! ] [ slap! slap! slap! slap! ] ow! ow! [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium-rich tums starts working so fast you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums martha: this is a possible big setback for gun control advocates. senate majority leader harry reid says that he is dropping the assault weapons ban part of this which is really what we've been talking about all along. dropping that from the senate's gun control package. i'm joined by senator scott brown who is not at all surprised by this action. the former u.s. senator and fox news contributor joins us now. senator, good to have you with us to america's newsroom. >> thank you very much. martha: a lot of people talked about the big talk on sought weapons ban and it was so important to be passed. now it is not in the bill and been deleted. >> he is particular harry
and educate the people in pakistan? the administration has the power and ability to make it right. but this program is not reinstated, i'm going to introduce legislation to withhold nondefense foreign aid from pakistan until this wonderful program for our troops is fully funded. >> brian: he will introduce the bill in a few hours. we gave pakistan $12.7 million for education last year, a quarter of the tuition help needed for the marines. >> anna: in a stunning new report on mammograms, researchers saying 60% of abnormal mammograms turn out not to be cancer and they can lead to unnecessary surgery or biopsy. this is taking a serious mental toll on some patients. women who received a false positive report that they have anxiety and depression three years after learning that they're cancer free. >> steve: meanwhile, here is a story you'll be talk being all day. tv anchors are supposed to be ready for anything that they read on the teleprompter, right? >> and we do have some breaking news to report to you. fox 54 has just learned that a huntsville news anchor is being proposed on liv
of various scenarios, how things can be handled. a few, what is happening? caller: i am in education, and we have civilians students and military in the same classes. of theworking options next go around of not having civilians in the classroom because they cannot be in there for five days a week. we are looking at all the different options, have to spend a lot of tried -- time. host: let's hear from another federal worker, a democrat in virginia. good morning, michael. say godi would like to bless america and c-span, and thank you for being here. i would like to say, the sequestration is going to have a big affect up and down the east coast, from here to texas, that firstpan into the early and second quarter of next year. work, psychologically, i see people slowing down. you know, inlike, a grip, waiting for some thing to happen. i have friends and other agencies, and other parts of virginia and places. i just see the intensity. cut ofu throw in the almost $10,000 for me, for 22 days, you add the payroll tax, i am looking at a setback of -- or a contraction of 13,000 dollars or $14,000 this
than any other time; progressive education, where we've spent more per capita on students but are getting less and less return on the test scores. those aren't my ideas, morals, ideals, and values, that's the other side's. so i'm trying to get them to defend their philosophy and get a controversy and debate going with this book. >> where were you born? >> i was born in washington, d.c. my mother was there at the time, so it was convenient for both of us. >> and what were your parents doing here? >> well, my dad was a very successful salesman. my mom is a homemaker and is still living. he sold business equipment, calculating machines, and move here at the age of 19 from another washington-- washington, indiana, the oldest of nine children. he and all of his brothers were in the army during world war ii and never expected to give birth, to sire a journalist like myself. there was nobody like me in the family, and i thk there are some family members who may be grateful for that. >> and how many brothers and sisters? >> well, i have one brother, a younger brother. >> what's he
california company startups and the like. the underlining foundation of infrastructure, education, the existing businesses that are in california. all of that provides a solid foundation for economic growth and for businesses to stay in california. some leave, but actually over the last decade and a half, it has been very small percentages of the total employment in california, actually less than 1% of the total employment has left. there has been a decline, but that is from the general collapse of the economy causing a crisis in the economy. the real key to success is education, research, infrastructure, manufacturing of all kinds of things and change. cheryl: i am glad you're bringing up the answers because that is what i wanted to hear from you, what can i do to keep companies like apple and facebook. these are companies that are still headquartered in california but expanding in the state of texas. one thing we look at was the cost of doing business, to look at the national average, texas is well below the national average when it comes to doing business, cost o the cost of bu
of the health education committee, this is not just a veterans issue, it is an issue for the entire nation, but we have in terms of mental health providers. these long wait times that i mentioned are partially caused by staffing shortages. i am pleased that secretaries hassecchi -- shinsechi applied to hire more mental health conditions. as of the 13th they fired more than3000, including more 1100 of these new mental health clinicians. this is good progress towards reaching their goal. emphasize this point, i am very concerned that va has hired only 37 clinicians in the last two months. i understand the challenges. i think we all understand the challenges. you do not walk down the street and get the first person. you want to make sure the person you are hiring is well-trained and of the quality that the veterans deserve, but clearly the va must step up hiring if they intend to meet their goal of 16 new clinicians by june of this year. they will be attempting to meet over 500 in the next few months and i do not see how that is possible. we do want to talk to the va about how they are moving
are " ridiculous and insensitive ". three months ago, a gunman killed 21st graders, six educators and himself in december after shooting his mother to death. messages seeking comment were left with the nra, which like other nonprofit groups is allowed to make or bacall's under federal law. tell us what you think on our kron4 facebook page @ facebook .com/kron4. 6:43 a.m. and we will be right back. wow, 1w,0 days of allergy relief. i'm still claritin clear ! i'vei' been claritin clear for 12 days ! whenwh your allergies start,t, doctorcts recommend taking one clinically-proven claritinn every erday during your allergy season for continuous relief.. 18 day ds !! 17 day ds !! i'm stm ill claritin clear ! 22 d22ays of continuous relief. liveli claritin clear.r. every day. challenge: taketa the claritin clear get continuous, non-drowsy allergy relieff or yorour money back.. go tgoo claritinchallenge.com for details.s. i found our colors.. we've made a decision. great, let's go get you set up... you yoshould check out our seworkshops... push your color boundaries while staying well within your budg
. she was shot because she was outspoken about equal education rights for women. ainsley? >> thanks, patti ann. >> top taxpayers already seeing a recent hike in the latest income tax. they have a new reason to blow their lids now. a $120 million retro active tax grab is hitting small business owners. we have the story. >> after determining in december a decade's old tax break is no longer there they are tack that enter reas entrepreneurs who claimed the break over the years. the business owners aren't too happy about that. >> how would you feel you made a decision four years ago you knew was legally correct and four years later a governing body came in and said it's not correct now you owe us a bunch more money and we are going to charge you interest on money that you didn't even know you owed. >> that was brian over street who had research system last year. they paid their taxes based on the law at the time. but the state appeals court ruled the tax break provision requiring companies maintain 80 percent of the work force in california was unconstitutional. the state franchise tax
anything. >> at least a big education. so you can make your own decisions. >> stephanie: that's what he said. this is about education. there's obesity smoke. he's right about everything he's talking about. it is how you address those problems. >> at the same time, the gun regulation issue is in the forefront so they can put those two together. >> stephanie: if he wanted to have a sense of humor, he would dress like mary upons and fly in with an umbrella for his next press conference. >> it would be a spoonful of splenda, not sugar. >> stephanie: representative mark ta can na next on "the stephanie miller show." >> stephanie: hour number three, representative mark takano joins us next to talk about the big week at the supreme court d is marriage equality week. skied jacki schechner if she would make up with me and she said no. >> that's different from all other weeks howe? >> stephanie: you would be feeling festive in some way. >> you've been away a week. i missed you. >> stephanie: prove it. just kidding. okay. she lets me. >> you're going to make that apology call right after the show.
in this country who has not used the american taxpayer dollars to get their education. a friend of mine was refused service. somebody will have to explain that to me. i don't understand it. thank you. host: we have got more on the affordable care act. this is some analysis from the urban institute, and they write -- third, the new law will not affect most firms -- new york is on our line for democrats. good morning. caller: hi. yeah, i am calling listening to everybody who has called. it is really very upsetting, this entire thing. people in this country need help. everybody knows it, and the reason i am calling is president obama at some point has said that what we ought to do is give doctors the money, extra healthfor preventive care. you go into a doctor's office nowadays, and the first thing he does is give you a pill. a lot of people, they will give you samples. a lot of of people don't know, but these doctors get money for pressuring certain pills. and i think that is absolutely wrong. evidently, it is not illegal. i think somebody ought to look into that, because it would bring d
tibbetts who helps girls' education in developing countries. so the four of them, you can go on the dvt awards and you can read about them, you can listen to their videos. and then please vote, because the more votes we have, i feel is fair ir it is. >> and i have to say i've gone online and i haven't been able to vote yet because i can't decide. but i will. >> i'm not going to say who i voted for, but i did vote. >> this has always been a passion project of yours. >> yes, the awards is a wonderful thing and the people's award is nice because we can contribute and have -- everybody vote in and i like that. i like to see how many votes there are. butky mention the leadership award? can i mention that we have a leadership award, lifetime 4r5ed leadership award that one year we gave to hillary. and one year to oprah. and this year, it's going to robin roberts. >> oh, that is very. [ applause ] that's very sweet. very sweet. >> and the best thing is when i e-mailed her and i said would you accept this, and she said, i've been offered many awards and i say no to everyone, but i say yes to yo
showing off. >> brian: thattity grade education. >> alisyn: pretty much. >> brian: who booked her? [ laughter ] >> steve: why can't we be friends, to quote the golden girls. >> brian: they said that? >> steve: thank you for being a friend. >> brian: what about the beatles, we all live in a yellow submarine? [ laughter ] >> brian, you're fired. >> alisyn: here is another question. what if an asteroid were hurdling towards earth? >> brian: are you trying to change the subject. >> alisyn: would the u.s. be able to stop it? nasa says not unless the u.s. is ready to pay up. ainsley earhart has more. >> they're basically telling you to get on your knees and start praying. these killer asteroids are usually only seen in the movies, right? but last month's russia's close call with a meteor got people a little worried. yesterday nasa officials told congress they have only detected about 10% of meteors like that one which could wipe out an entire city. and while funding to track space threats has grown, nasa needs to spend billions in the next few years to expand the program, they say. offi
million worth of shares. some of the $1.9 billion from the education business. the shares are down 12% year-to-date. you can see up 3.5. we're watching smithfield foods. smithfield foods have hired goldman sachs in order to weigh some strategic options including breaking up the company. this is according to reuters. smithfield foods up on this news, up about 3% on the day. back to you. tracy: thanks, nicole. we'll see you at the top of the hour. ashley: march madness is in full swing and cbs and turner scooping up millions of eyeballs tuning into the turn any but now there is speculation that the final four coverage could move to cable as early as next year. dennis kneale covering this story and joins us now. dennis. >> hello, ashley. kind of a good news, bad news thing for cbs because they're raking in some really good ratings so far in the first week of march madness, the college basketball tournament. cb. is putting out a press release moments ago saying this is some of the highest ratings that the basketball product has brought in over 20 years. just one problem, variety, the trad
's excited to be back in school and wants girls everywhere to have the same opportunity of an education. >>> a new government estimate out this morning says 1 in 50 schoolchildren in the u.s. has autism, a previous estimate put the number at 1 in 88. the cdc says its new numbers do not necessarily mean autism is occurring more often but it may indicate it is being diagnosed more frequently than before. the estimate suggests at least 1 million american children have autism. >>> and a puppy named pachino may be too young to learn new tricks, trying to figure out how to catch. take a look. >> one, two, three. catch. >> oh. poor thing. the trick will take some work but pachina has already become a big dog online getting a lot of hits for that. >> adorable. he plays dead i guess. >> working the kinks out. >> 11 minutes after the hour. >> trying. >> very cute. let's check in with dylan dreyer, made it back out on our rock park today. >> i love being outside at rock park and you guys too, getting real flowers and fake flowers, so many things given out and helping to keep people warm because it
taxes, limited regulation. job creation, pension reform, education reform. this is working and it's getting results for people and that's what people want. they want government to work well and stay out of their way and spend their money wisely and that's what governors do. martha: that is one of the big questions. reince priebus talked about reaching out to groups like the naacp and la raza and there is an editorial this morning in "the national review" which disagrees with that notion. says no. actually what conservatives need to do is prove to hispanics why they have a better way of helping people of helping the middle class. what do you think? >> i don't think those are inconsistent. we need to stick to our principles. if we become more like the democratic party, they don't need us. we have bright colors that reagan talked about which is what we stand for on taxes, regulation, spending life, family. marriage, other things like that, that are pillars of the republican party. but then i think they're right. show people of all ethnicities, of income stratus, show why the principl
in jobs, education, housing and get this economy back on track. we don'tg to make sure go into this or don't continue with the state of perpetual war. host: let's talk about the budget issues. president obama on the hill last democrats g to house from bloomberg's reporting he all of you to agree to entitlement changes to medicare saying it iscurity better to make the changes when office rather n than a republican. what was your reaction? guest: first, no benefit cuts. the bottom line for myself. no cuts in social security, medicare.nd they are benefits that one works for all of their lives or either disabled or can't work for whatever reason. so, we owe this to the american people. when you talk about reform and medicare and medicaid, social medicare for example, we could allow for more for prescription drugs. that would achieve cost savings. achieve many ways to savings without cutting benefits. the formulas that would cut i do not support. host: what about raising 65igibility for medicare from -- guest: no, i do not support that. when you look at many people in sectors and industrial s
in science and research and education, it more . an doubles the sequester cut it violates important commitments we've made to our seniors. it reopens the prescription drug doughnut hole so seniors with high health care costs will pay thousands more during the period of this budget. it turns medicare into a voucher program so seniors face the risk of rising health care costs. and finally, mr. chairman, it's based on this false idea that you can claim to balance the budget in 10 years when you claim also to be getting rid of obamacare when all they do is get rid of the benefits of obamacare. this reached the time of balance because they keep the affordable care act, obamacare. i urge my colleagues to reject this approach and to adopt the balanced democratic approach to dealing with these national challenges. the chair: the time of the gentleman has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin is recognized for 3 1/2 minutes. mr. ryan: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. ryan: mr. chairman, this budget is constructive. it reveals each side's
months ago for demanding the girls in her country be educated. the 15-year-old talked about her first day back in class. >> i think it is the happiest moment that i'm going back to my school. and today i will have my books, my bag and i will talk to my friends. i'll talk to my teacher. >> wonderful outlook. she's been getting medical treatment in birmingham, england. >> it's so nice to see her going back to school. exactly what she wants to do. >>> it is first day of spring, believe it or not. but not for big part of the country. next we go live where winter weather is still causing major problems this morning. (announcer) make mornings special, with fancy feast mornings gourmet cat food. mornings are delicious protein rich entrees with gardes fancy feast mornings. the best ingredient is love. you know who you are. you can part a crowd, without saying a word... if you have yet to master the quiet sneeze... you stash tissues like a squirrel stashes nuts... well muddlers, muddle no more. try zyrtec®. it gives you powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin® because zy
thoughts on the subject. >> obviously college education is great. i personally think if you have a big idea and people who are willing to do it with you, drop out, go for it. have fun. the worst that happens you fail of the the best that happens you have a great time and build something exciting. >> always go back of the he started his first company when he was 12 years old. this is his third company. you leave your money, wallet, everything at home. pay with the smartphone. this, level up, is how you do it. back to you guys in the studio. melissa: very cool. lori: more ways to pay. my husband is thrilled. credit cards, cash. anyway, congresswoman marsha blackburn says congress must act now to cut our nation's exploding debt. she joins tracy byrnes and adam shapiro next here on fox business. stay with us. friday night, buddy. you are gonna need a wingman. and my cash back keeps the party going. but my airline miles take it worldwide. [ male announcer ] it shouldn't be this hard. with creditcards.com, it's easy to search hundreds of cards and apply online. creditcards.com. adam: welcome back
capital or infrastructure or investing in education, and those which do not, which endanger our future by adding to the national debt. and this war deficit was of the second type. amthird point that i passionate about, although it is difficult for many people to be passionate about accounting, but i am passionate about the lack of war accounting. one of the purposes of our book and the several book chapters that we have written since then is to argue that bad accounting matters. the u.s. owes nearly a trillion dollars in what business would call deferred compensation to the men and women who fought the war, but this liability does not appear anywhere on the national balance sheet. we did not account for the value of the 6658 lives lost in iraq and afghanistan. that is just the troops, not civilians, not contractors, except for small amount of life insurance money. even though civilian government agencies estimate the value of life at $7.20 million, so osha or epa would account for it at $7.20 million. we have accrued trillion of dollars and more debt, but we don't keep track of it. in
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)